How I Became a Scribbler by guest writer Ramz Artso

From a very early age, I enjoyed to fantasize. I’d imagine that Spiderman was a good friend of mine and that he would secretly escort me to school every morning by jumping from roof to roof, whilst shooting that wonderful web of his. To this day, I am jealous of his locomotive methods. Whenever I’d watch some series, like DuckTales, for instance, I’d come up with extra episodes in my mind and replay them to myself if I happened to grow bored. Reality, it seemed, was never eventful enough to keep me entertained.
Eventually, my fondness of the world of make-believe transitioned into drawing and painting. I’d lay down a blank sheet of paper before myself, split it into many different screenshots and produce a short story of sorts.

For some reason, these stories would mostly revolve around laser blasters or witches.
As time elapsed and I grew older, I decided it’d be great to become a movie director. But the odds were heavily against me and I quickly gave up on the childish dream. That said, my love of creation and storytelling remained.

Then, much to my surprise, I was sent to boarding schools in Switzerland, where I got to meet people from all over the world. My experience as a boarder really had a huge impact on me and my writing, and I think it can easily be observed in Victoria Carnahan and the Red Cloaks. I learned how to ski, speak different languages, understand and respect foreign cultures and be independent, really. I was introduced to camping, which is why I love nature – especially the Alps and glaciers – and all kinds of sports, ranging from Ping-Pong and rugby to mountain climbing and canoeing.

Somewhere in the midst of all this, I happened across Harry Potter and it changed my life once and for all, as I became a voracious reader after having read all of the books. J.K. Rowling, along with J.R.R. Tolkien, inspired me to write my first novel. Much to my disappointment, though, my first written work, Eldar Cornavian, did not meet my expectations. What with being a teenager, I didn’t think much of the disappointment and simply went about life without a single care in the world, finding socializing with my peers a much more pleasant and interesting prospect than editing and writing.

However, the teen years eventually skidded to an end and my excitement, if you will, was snuffed out like a mere candle. That was when I watched Christopher Nolan’s Inception. The movie blew me away – I was in awe of his genius. All of a sudden, I found that I wanted to create something just as captivating and great. Something that would make people experience what I had experienced in the cinema that day. And so, without further ado, I took to intense plotting. Once I was done, I instantly continued on to vehement writing. Probably a year later, I had my second novel lying on my desktop, collecting digital dust. I was already getting ready to send it off to publishing houses in the U.S. when I first learned of indie writers.

Of course, just like anyone else who has spent many sleepless nights bringing something into existence, I loved the idea of being able to pull all the strings, and so, without much forethought, I plunged headfirst into this wonderful community. So far, I am inclined to say I love it and have no regrets whatsoever. I do what I love most, which is write, of course. And if you were to ask me why I write, I’d most probably say: Because it’s a cathartic experience every time I do. Pent-up words are no different from pent-up rage; the whole thing just isn’t healthy.

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